Tangible high fashion spring trends


The rich tradition and lavishness of the fashion world has such an aura of sophistication that has been untouched for years. It is known not to question the costume-like pieces that have paraded catwalks for years or you will be viewed as lacking the artistry and style yourself. However, these wardrobes have never been seen on a typical sidewalk or anywhere except for a magazine page or a runway. These are unrealistic fashion trend expectations for the everyday bustling workers and housewife that is trying to stay afloat.


This past year has warped everybody’s sense of normalcy, and the fashion world is no exception. Fashion week appeared online this year, and to many, that was very discouraging. The traditional fashion week was now flipped on its head to be virtual and different for the first time in history. However, Vogue flips this negativity on its head by stating, “We are experiencing something actually new. In an industry that hews so passionately to tradition, heritage, and status quo, how exciting is it to feel that after seasons of talk, we are finally on the precipice of real, tangible change? For the first time in a long time, these look like clothes that are meant to be worn.”


2020 stripped the fashion industry to its core of what brings it together: clothes. It is not about the price of what you wear, the models you get in your show or who is in the audience. It is about artistry, and that has come to life over the past year. It is in the DIY challenges (check out #VogueCouchCouture) and the street style portfolios. It is the photo shoots in your backyard and accessorizing from the hips up to be fashionable on zoom. This shows that the energy of the fashion world refuses to be muted by being separated, and makes the argument that it is stronger than ever before, which is in no way discouraging.


In watching fashion week this year, the trends are made for the real people who make up the fashion industry and the elite trendsetters alike. It shows a band of community that we all need right now. Below is how the big-names of the fashion industry displayed this in fashion week, collected by Harper's Bazaar.

Virgil Abloh for Off-White:



“Virgil Abloh is fostering a sense of community among creatives and celebrating inclusivity,” Harper’s Bazaar wrote. He debuted her Imaginary TV which highlighted twenty documentaries of everyday people in hopes to “connect and generate a global network, and bring together a creativity while catalyzing a range of emotions,” he told Harper's Bazaar. His collection titled “Adam and Eve” focused on style essentials with some twists featuring color and safety. It projects the spring 2021 trends of trousers, light pastels and day dresses.


Creative Director Anthony Vaccarello for Saint Laurent:



“I wanted to focus on the essence of things,” he explains to Harper's Bazaar. “I think it’s a sign of the times. But I didn’t want anything bleak or heavy. The desert, to me, symbolizes that yearn for serenity, open space, a slower rhythm. The clothes are also softer, the spirit of the collection is more gentle, stripped back.” The collection is menswear-inspired separate pieces and sheer dresses that are simple and made to wear around a serine home. It sets the spring trends of simple dresses and blazers.


Virginie Viard for Chanel:



Chanel’s spring 2021 collection was inspired by nostalgic women in cinema while making these inspiring actresses a tangible reality for girls to look like. “I was thinking about them who make us dream so much," Viard told Harper's Bazaar. "But without wanting to replicate. Without falling into a vintage citation. I wanted it to be very joyful, colorful, and very vibrant too.” The collection features optimistic pastels and whites that are overpowering the spring 2021 trend, along with youthful graphic tees and the wide-framed blazer.


Creative Director Matthew Williams for Givenchy:



Williams sums up this change in the fashion world perfectly in describing his debut collection for Givenchy. “You find the pieces of the puzzle for a collection, building it from symbols and signs, but never forgetting the reality of the person who will wear it and bring it to life," he told Harper's Bazaar. "The women and men should be powerful and effortless, equal and joyful, a reflection of who they really are—only more so. It’s about finding humanity in luxury.” His campaign shows more of the masculine shoulder pads and house dresses.


The fashion world has banded together like never before. This modern evolution to the rich tradition has offered more opportunities to the typical fashion lover than ever before. High-fashion is tangible this spring. Purchase broad-shouldered blazers and pleated coats in contrast to pastel dresses and flowing pleated trousers to hold your own amongst style icons in the industry. Now is your chance.


For more quotes read:

https://www.harpersbazaar.com/fashion/fashion-week/g34197591/paris-fashion-week-spring-2021/


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